Jagged Stripes!

Hello out there!

Yesterday I published the Jagged Stripes pattern – a pattern for both a shawl and a blanket, which can be made as a temperature registration piece. Never heard of temperature registration? Well, in this case it is a knitting (or crochet) project where one row is done for each day, using a yarn color designated to that day’s temperature. After 365 days you can get something like this:

 

2017 Temperatures Copenhagen

These are the temperatures I registered for Copenhagen (Denmark) during 2017 – the highest temperature of the day (left), the lowest temperature (center), and the average values (right). See how different it comes out depending on which range you choose?

For illustrating the Jagged Stripes blanket, I used the highest temperatures range (rainbows are so pretty):

Jagged Stripes Blanket

A bit of background to mention here: When you search on Ravelry for “temperature”, you get all kinds of patterns (and projects!) for temperature items. However, most of them are plain, straight garter stitch items, nothing fancy. That might be great for some, but for me… I wanted something else! So I designed this one, garter stitch with a little twist.
I added a “neutral” color at the beginning and end of the item, as I do want the edges to be straight. This means there is a bit of short row shaping going on at the beginning and the end of the year – but don’t fret, it can also easily be made without those edges! You’ll then just have the raw zig-zag edge.

I have added an Excel spreadsheet where you can track your local temperatures, see what the blanket looks like after a while, and even customize the size you want based on your own gauge. I have based it on the values I would use myself, using degrees Celsius to record temperatures and using the colors I want to use. I have added a cheat sheet for looking up the degrees Celsius if you’re usually working with Fahrenheit though!
If you’re familiar with Excel and want to change colors or temperature ranges, see below for a tutorial.

There is a lot more information on the Ravelry pattern page, which can be found here: Jagged Stripes
Note that this pattern is free – and I hope to keep it so indefinitely.


 

How can I modify the Excel spreadsheet for my Temperature Blanket/Shawl?

If you want to change either the colors used or the temperature ranges used in the spreadsheet, AND you more or less know your way around in Excel, here is a video tutorial on how to do so. I would however only recommend it if you’re an Excel user already – it can be easy to accidentally mess it up completely!
Please note that I’m using Microsoft Office 2013 on a Windows computer.

 

 

New Design: Classic Plaits

Today is a really dreary, rainy day in Copenhagen, Denmark. It makes me want to knit with brightly colored yarns in order to get a bit of brightness in my day – and what is better than a summer sun yellow?

Classic Plaits

Today I published the pattern for Classic Plaits, a simple pair of socks that are worked toe-up, featuring instructions for two types of heel: Short row or afterthought. The detail on these socks is a simple cabled braid along the outside of the foot, making them interesting but still very quiet to look at. I can imagine them quite well in a sophisticated grey, or any other semisolid yarn out there!

Classic Plaits

Find Classic Plaits on Ravelry to see more photos, or go directly to buying the pattern here.

 

New Design: At An Angle / På Kanten

At the end of May, I published a new shawl pattern: At An Angle.

At An Angle shawl

As so often before, my love for garter stitch overcame me, and the different colors of this naturally dyed lambswool from (G)uld beckoned to become something fun.

Worked sideways from tip to tip, increases and decreases shape this triangular shawl. The angled stripe in the middle is placed using short rows, which is easy and almost invisible in the squishy garter stitch.

The color choice makes all the difference here! The simplicity of the shawl makes it easy to work and makes it fit for your casual every-day outfit, but can also accent a more dressed-up you.

At An Angle shawl

The pattern is currently available in English as well as in Danish (the Danish name: “På Kanten”). I used a Danish yarn (the Scottish Lambswool from (G)uld, naturally dyed with indigo and madder), which is available in a number of OOAK shades, depending on what the dyers find in nature.

See more photos and projects from other knitters on Ravelry!

At An Angle on Ravelry

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At An Angle shawl

New Design: New Start

In September, I released a shawl pattern in collaboration with Rainbow Heirloom: The Road I Took. It is a pattern show casing the Nostalgia Club September colorway – and this month, I’ve been so lucky to get the chance to design something with the January colorway called ‘Auld Lang Syne’. See the blog post on the Rainbow Heirloom blog here!

Emily sent me 3 skeins of yarn: two skeins in the club base, Rainbow Heirloom Lush Light, and one skein in the Sweater base. Being different fiber blends, the colorway came out slightly different on the two bases. I decided to mix the different yarn weights, just to see if I could make it work!

New Start cardigan

The New Start cardigan is worked up in a fun construction. First, the back panel is worked in the worsted weight Sweater yarn, then stitches are picked up for the fronts worked in Lush Light. The collar is worked, and at the end the sleeves, using a raglan construction worked with short rows.

New Start cardigan

New Start cardigan

The process kept me interested all the way through. It was so much fun to see it shape up, add different stitch patterns for the ribbing, and get a final result I love!

New Start cardigan

This cardigan, being cropped, works really well with dresses. Most of my dresses flare from the waist, and I have always been a bit sad about the usual full length cardigans interfering with that cut. This is my solution – and it’s a much used one already! I even made a second version in my own handspun yarn, slightly different, but I’m very happy with it.

You can see the pattern page on Ravelry here.

Buy the pattern directly right here!

Rainbow Heirloom has the colorway in the shop this month, on both the Lush Light and Sweater. Go take a look, the color is so beautiful!
Nostalgia Club on Rainbow Heirloom

New Design: Trillidium

My newest shawl is something I have been working on for a looooong time – especially since that lace-y border just didn’t want to work out. Initially, I had no specific plan for that border – I was perusing stitchionaries for weeks, but never found anything in particular that I thought suited the body of this shawl.

Until… Well, until I (yet again) stumbled over the Estonian lace flower that has been used in so many different settings.

I decided to use it for the edging of this shawl, setting off the sheer striping effect (acquired by alternating one and two strands of yarn) perfectly. Also, after the soothing (some might say boring!) knit of garter stitch for the body, what is better than finishing it off with some intricate lace?

Trillidium

Trillidium is named after the trillidium govanianum, a rare Himalayan plant of the Trilliaceae family. The plant has three leaves, and the flower three petals.
The yarn I used is a little “rare” as well – actually, I used a discontinued yarn. I know, I know – a designer should NEVER do that! I’m so sorry! I just couldn’t help myself, as I found the yarn (Juno Fibre Arts Bliss) and colorway (Ocean) perfect for a shawl this size and type. Luckily, there are lots of companies out there that deliver yarns which resemble the one I used, and I’ve given a couple of suggestions in the pattern as well.

Trillidium

Trillidium

Trillidium

For more photos and details, take a look at the Ravelry pattern page: Trillidium
There you will also find links to other knitters’ versions of the shawl. Some of my testers have tried out two-color versions, with fabulous results!

Click here to buy the pattern now.